Cultivar List

Registering your cultivar

The Cyclamen Society is the International Registration Authority for cultivars of all species of Cyclamen except those of C. persicum. You can read how to register any desirable new plant which you have bred to reproduce true from seed via the link above. For more information email registrar@cyclamen.org.

Cyclamen cultivars (other than C. persicum florists’ cultivars) as at January 2021

Where the Society has an image of a registered cultivar, a link has been inserted in this list. The image and any further details about the listed cultivars can be viewed by clicking on the link.

The list currently contains scant details of some registered cultivars. Anyone who has cultivars that they believe should be  registered, or who can provide illustrations or further information about those that are listed, is requested to email the Registrar, at registrar@cyclamen.org, or the Webmaster, at webmaster@cyclamen.org.

Cyclamen africanum

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen alpinum

‘Pink Swirl’: leaves unremarkable; flowers particularly large and elegant, in clear pink. A 1984 Basil Smith cultivar, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Red Devil’: leaves two-toned; flowers rather tall, clear deep red. A Basil Smith cultivar, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Speckles’: leaves unremarkable; flowers quite distinctive, pale pink with darker carmine speckling. A Basil Smith cultivar, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

C. alpinum forma leucanthum

‘Album’: white-flowered variants have been named as ‘Album’ but should all properly be referred to as C. alpinum forma leucanthum, named by Christopher Grey-Wilson in 1997. These are not completely white (which would probably be accorded the epithet albissimum), having the characteristic solid purplish stain around the mouth.

‘Nettleton White’: leaves marbled and typical for the species; flowers near-white with usual purple stain at the corolla mouth.

Cyclamen balearicum

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen cilicium

‘Album’: pure white-flowered variants have been named as ‘Album’ they are not cultivars and should all properly be referred to as C. cilicium forma album.

‘Bowles Variety’: presumably originating from plants grown at Myddleton House by E. A. Bowles. Grey-Wilson (2002) notes this as being a rather ordinary C. cilicium of no particular merit. Now many generations down the line and indistinguishable from other plants in cultivation.

‘Jean Marie Vande weghe 1’: Leaves completely silver, flowers are standard C. cilicium with the customary honey scent.

‘Jean Marie Vande weghe 2’: Leaves silver with a small, dark green, Christmas tree shape in the centre, flowers are standard C. cilicium with the customary honey scent.

Cyclamen colchicum

‘Deirdre’: a completely plain green leaved selection with conspicuous toothed leaf margins by Jan Bravenboer. Flowers pale pink with darker pink veins.

Cyclamen confusum

‘Raspberry’: large, handsome deep pink flowers. Some leaf forms are now showing silver patterns on a dark green background and these are promising candidates for future cultivar development.

Cyclamen coum

With such a variable species, that is easy to grow and raise from seed, it is not surprising there are many named selections.

Cyclamen coum subsp. coum forma coum (various coloured flower forms)

‘Alice D’: named for Alice Dingeman by Jan Bravenboer. Rounded grey-green leaves with a darker green rim. Dark pink flowers with pink centre.

‘Ballet’: Essentially a member of the Pewter Group; bicolour pink flowered with the corolla lobes held horizontally, in the manner of C. alpinum.

‘Blush’: green-edged pewter-coloured leaves; flowers pale rose-pink with rose-magenta blotch at mouth. A selection by Kath Dryden VMH.

‘Broadleigh Silver’: silver or pewter-coloured leaves; flowers variable shades of pink; possibly C. coumC. alpinum hybrids. The original plants were purchased at an RHS show event from the Broadleigh Gardens stall by Basil Smith, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘BSBE 518 form 1’: leaves overall silver with a green margin, pink flowers with a magenta basal blotch.

‘BSBE 518 form 2’: leaves silver with a green central hastate pattern, pink flowers with a magenta basal blotch.

‘Crimson King’: attractively marked leaves; rich crimson-coloured flowers, very similar to those of ‘Meadens Crimson’.

‘Cyberia Series’: by Syngenta Europe – ‘Dark Rose’, ‘Mix’, ‘Pink’, ‘Rose Silver’, ‘White’. Leaves: round/kidney-shaped, green/silvered and with/without heart. Many small flowers, constantly from December. A series of commercial cultivars very similar to numerous other forms in cultivation.

‘Dusky Maid’: round greyish-green, rather scalloped leaves; crimson-magenta flowers. A Basil Smith cultivar that Grey-Wilson (2002) notes is a vigorous and relatively free flowering cultivar, with most progeny like the parents in leaf, but variable in flower. Ability to set seed has also been noted as rather poor. The original plant was selected from a batch of young plants on a Cyclamen Society stand. Possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Heavy Metal’: rounded, completely silver-washed leaves, sometimes with a thin green margin and midrib; pale pink flowers with wide-spreading petals. A 1995 Basil Smith cultivar which had a high percentage of seedlings coming true to type. Possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Linnett Jewel’: silver and green patterned leaves, although unremarkable for the species; large, well rounded, deep magenta flowers, the petals paler towards the centre. A 1995 Basil Smith cultivar, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Linnett Rose’: leaves deep green with grey pattern; pinkish-rose flowers, the petals deeper at their margins. A floriferous cultivar which sets seed well, reported to have been developed from a seedling of ‘Macka’, introduced by Basil Smith in 1994, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Maçka’: leaves rounded, silver-washed with a small, central deep green area; flowers deep pinkish-magenta. Originating from the town of that name in Turkey, collected in 1966 by S. Albury, M. Cheese and J. Watson.
An unusual form new to cultivation at the time, but since the introduction of similar and better forms from the  Cyclamen Society Expeditions of 1987 and 1988 it has been superseded. After so long, plants bearing the name are unlikely to resemble the original.

‘Marie’: ‘Marie Patterned Leaf’: ‘Marie Silver Leaf’: ‘Marie X-mas’ selections by Jan Bravenboer with petals that are only partially or not reflexed at all.

‘Meadens Crimson’: plain deep green leaves; deep crimson-magenta blooms.

‘Nymans’: typical rounded coum leaves of a rather yellowish-green; flowers small, deep claret-coloured with pale markings in the form of a V at the base of each petal.

Pewter Group: leaves pewter-coloured, originally with a green margin and central vein, now often all over pewter; flowers variable, white through pink to magenta; raised by Kath Dryden VMH; ‘Ballet‘, ‘Blush’, ‘Maurice Dryden’, ‘Quaker Pearl’ and ‘White Pewter’ are all members of this group.

‘Quaker Pearl’: Essentially a member of the Pewter Group; pink flowered with the corolla lobes reflexed like typical coum; a pink flowered ‘Maurice Dryden’.

‘Roseum’: leaves attractively patterned silver; flowers large, rose-pink with magenta markings at the mouth.

‘Rubrum’: general name given to forms with deeply coloured flowers.

‘Ruby Star’: Flower, standard coum in dark magenta; leaves, dark green with indistinct paler green markings. Unremarkable.

‘Silver Star’: striking silver-coloured orbicular leaves with obvious veining; flowers bicoloured pink and white, roughly shuttlecock-shaped; developed from seedlings of a plant (CSE88397) collected by The Cyclamen Society in northern Turkey.

‘Stirling Silver’: leaves with very striking luminous quality, silvery-white, unmarked; flowers in various shades of pale magenta.

‘Tilebarn Elizabeth’: leaves entirely pewter-coloured without green veining; flowers bicoloured, very pale pink or whitish, flushed deeper towards the petal margins.

‘Tilebarn Graham’: leaves rounded, silver-coloured; flowers rather small with elegant narrow, twisted petals, pink with deep magenta blotch at the mouth.

‘Turkish Princess’: leaves green with overlay of silver; flowers bicoloured pink and magenta. A Basil Smith cultivar with a good percentage coming true from seed, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Urfa’: leaves rounded with a slightly pointed apex, marked with a striking ‘Christmas tree’ pattern; flowers rather squat, deep magenta-pink with a deeper coloured blotch at the mouth.

Cyclamen coum subsp. coum forma pallidum (white flower forms with normal marking at the mouth)

‘Album’: leaves rounded, deep green, shiny and without markings; flowers white with magenta markings at the mouth.

‘Marbled Moon’: handsomely marked leaves; small (‘dumpy’) flowers white with magenta markings at the mouth.

‘Maurice Dryden’: Essentially a member of the Pewter Group; leaves, variable silver or pewter-coloured with green margin; flowers, white with a dark purple stain at the mouth.

‘Porcelain’: plain green orbicular leaves; white flowers with thin magenta veining on the petals; bred by Jan Bravenboer.

‘White Pewter’: Essentially a member of the Pewter Group; leaves, pewter-coloured with a green margin and central vein; flowers white with magenta markings at the mouth; raised by Kath Dryden VMH.

Cyclamen coum subsp. coum forma albissimum (pure white flower forms with no marking at the mouth)

‘Ashwood Snowflake’: leaves variously patterned in silver; flowers sometimes pale pink in bud, fading to pure white within 2 – 3 days.

‘George Bisson’: leaves patterned in pale green; a pure albino with no red at all on the leaf or flower stalk.

‘Golan Heights’: plain green glossy leaves; pure white flowers with a flat form which is typical of the southern populations of C. coum.

‘Lake Effect’: leaves deep matt green slightly marked with silver; pure white flowers with pleat edged petals like the ripples on a lake.

‘Tilebarn Fenella’: leaves patterned in pale green; pure white flowers, bred from a plant found by Manfred Koenen in 1980.

Cyclamen coum subsp. caucasicum

‘Linnett Charm’: leaves heart-shaped, deep green with a hastate pattern in various shades of pewter; flowers mid-pink with a basal darker blotch and pink or lavender rim to the mouth (unlike subsp. coum in which this zone is white). A 1995 Basil Smith Cultivar, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

Cyclamen creticum

‘Silvery Hope’: bright silvery leaves and white flowers; bred by Marco ten Hoope of the Netherlands.

‘Tilebarn Spoa’: found by Peter Moore of Tile Barn Nursery (now closed) near the village of Spoa on the island of Karpathos.

Cyclamen cyprium

‘Elizabeth Strangman’: deep green leaves, boldly marked with splashes of contrasting silver. Flowers, typical of the species.

‘Galaxy’: leaves with a deep sombre grey-green background, heavily spattered over the entire surface with silver flecks and spots (like the stars of a distant galaxy against a night sky).

‘Shiny Hope’: slightly glossy leaves with a dark green ‘Christmas tree’ centre surrounded by a lot of silver, containing a few green spots and with a dark green margin.

Cyclamen elegans

‘Reiko’: leaves heart-shaped, deep green, unremarkably patterned in paler green (with beetroot reverse); flowers darker than usual.

Cyclamen graecum subsp. candicum

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen graecum subsp. graecum

‘Elizabeth Drew’: leaves pewter coloured with a thin green margin; flowers large, pure white; it also has a valid botanical status as forma album.

‘Glyfada’: leaves pewter coloured with a thin green margin; flowers large, pale pinkish-purple; collected by Brian & Margaret Mathew near Glyfada, Attica in March 1971.

‘Mt Hymettus’: listed in the Alpine Garden Society seed list, in the absence of more information, must be presumed to refer to the original collection location, which sports a number of good forms of the species.

‘Rhodopou’: leaves silver or pewter with a narrow green border; flowers pink.

Cyclamen hederifolium subsp. crassifolium

‘Silver Shield’: leaves deep green with a striking pewter or paler green shield pattern in the centre; flowers pink.

‘Leonidi’, handsome silver leaves with a pale green central pattern extending along the veins, heavily suffused with pink when young and  a promising candidate for future cultivar development; flowers, pink.

Cyclamen hederifolium

With such a variable species it has been very tempting for gardeners to select out favourites and give them cultivar names, a course which is acceptable if the offspring turn out to be reasonably uniform. The following are some of the more well known:

Cyclamen hederifolium subsp. hederifolium (various coloured flower forms)

‘Amaze Me Series’: by Syngenta Europe – ‘Pink’, ‘Silver Me Pink’, ‘White’, ‘Silver Me White’. A series of commercial cultivars very similar to numerous other forms in cultivation.

‘Antiochus’: leaves attractively marbled; flowers deep pinkish-red. Initially selected by B. Wetzel, Wuppertal, Germany.

‘Bowles’s Apollo’ (‘Apollo’, ‘Bowles’s Apollo Group’): leaves with a large shield-shaped area of silver in the centre and another around the margin, separated by a green zone. The leaves also have an overlying flush of pink, although this is variable; flowers pink.

‘Ashwood Lysander’, ‘Lysander Group’: a distinct foliage strain of which the main feature of the Group is the very deeply-cut leaf margins, particularly well- developed in the immature foliage.

‘Coquette’: leaves green suffused pewter with an arrowhead green mark in the upper half of the blade; flowers white with a pinkish mouth and flushed lavender at the petal margins. The unopened white buds have a delicate tracery of lavender which makes this cultivar easy to recognise; best regarded as a pale picotee type.

‘Corfu Red’: Strictly speaking not actually red, according to the RHS colour chart but a name coined by members of the Cyclamen Society to describe plants found in Corfu.

‘Donkey Ears’: a selection by Olivier Vico; flowers, 3cm long pink petals; leaves with dark green centre surrounded by a pale zone, then a further dark green zone.

‘Ellen Corker’: leaves rather average for the species; flowers white, suffused with salmon-pink around the mouth.

‘Elsie Thomas’: leaves attractively marked; flowers with broad petals, pink richly stained deeper at the mouth and spreading up the petals but with the margins almost white. A 1993 Basil Smith cultivar, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Fairy Rings’: leaves with pale green centre surrounded by a dark zone, then a pale band margined by a further dark green zone; flowers mid-pink.

‘Green Elf’: leaves green, less than 3 cm long, with a central, pale green hastate pattern; flowers pale pink, carried on slender stalks. A Basil Smith selection originally introduced in 1989 under the erroneous name ‘Minimus’, renamed ‘Green Elf’ in 1994. Possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Highfield’: distinctively dark green glossy foliage with a central pewter or paler green centre; flowers pink, typical of the species.

Ian White form’: leaves with a central silver patch, dark green hastate surround, silver hastate ‘ring’ and dark green margin; flowers, pink.

‘Joy’s Choice’: leaves two-toned silver and pewter, 7-angled shape; flowers pink, of normal form and size. A Basil Smith cultivar from a seedling selected by Joy Bishop, which in turn originated from Phil Cornish’s ‘Silver Cloud’, in essence a very similar plant to ‘Silver Cloud’ but with a more pewter hue.

‘Linnett Stargazer’: leaves unremarkable; flowers facing upward instead of downward in the usual way. See ‘Stargazer’

‘Monstrosum’: flowers very large with petals 28 mm long from mouth to tip and 25 mm wide, carried on very thick stalks (around 4 mm in diameter), looking almost as if they were fasciated; noted in Greece in October 1972 by Herbert and Molly Crook. Possibly referable to subsp. crassifolium.

‘No Name’: leaves with a wide bright silver margin, a large central silver patch surrounded by a dark green hastate area; flowers, pink or white.

‘Peter Moore’: leaves, narrowly cordate to cordate with a large central pale cream zone, surrounded by broad green border; flowers pink or white; named by Jan Bravenboer.

‘Pewter Mist’: a selection by Jaques Amand; flowers, pink; leaves, silvery grey foliage with mottled edges and a small central darker hastate pattern toward the leaf tip; offered on their 2020 web catalogue.

‘Red Sky’: Flowers a good strong reddish purple, which retain their colour well with age; leaves, unremarkable for the species.

‘Rosenteppich’: leaves rather oval in shape, less lobed than most forms of C. hederifolium; flowers variable, the best forms rich deep pink to reddish-purple.

‘Ruby Glow’, ‘Ruby Strain’: leaves deep green, rather sombre with a hint of black, not particularly well marked; flowers deep rich magenta or magenta-purple, particularly intense around the mouth.

‘Ruby’s Peach’: An unusual flower coloured variant discovered by Ruby and David Baker at Tsagkarada in the Pelion, Greece.

‘San Marino Silver’: A selection with silvery leaves made by Ray Johnstone, presumed to be derived from plants or seeds originally collected near San Marino, Italy.

‘Silver Cloud’: silver or pewter-coloured leaves varying in shape from almost entire and heart-shaped to markedly lobed; flowers pink; Phil Cornish developed this cultivar and its identical leaved, white flowered sister ‘White Cloud’ in his Gloucestershire garden and has found it comes largely true from seed provided care is taken to isolate it from other C. hederifolium.

‘Spider’s Web’: leaves with a very bright silver webbed pattern, hence the name; the flowers are white with deep pink inside the corolla tube.

‘Stargazer’: leaves unremarkable; flowers upward-facing instead of downward-facing in the usual way, originally pale pink with a darker mouth.

‘Tilebarn Greville’: leaves narrow, ovate, very dark green with a bright silver shield shaped mark in the centre; flowers pink.

‘Tilebarn Silver Arrow’: leaves silver, arrow head shaped; flowers pink; developed from seedlings of ‘Tilebarn Helena’ and also named by Peter Moore.

Cyclamen hederifolium subsp. hederifolium forma albiflorum (pure white flower forms with no marking at the mouth)

‘Album’: any otherwise un-named C. hederifolium with pure white flowers would probably be given this cultivar name but should properly be referred to the valid botanical status C. hederifolium forma albiflorum.

‘Artemis’: leaves silver or pewter-coloured; distinctive and attractive leaf markings with a double shield pattern in grey or pewter rather than silver; flowers white.

‘Cotswold White’: selected white-flowered plants from seeds originally brought from southern Greece by Bob Brown; leaves rather narrow, metallic green with an attractive pattern in mid-green, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Daley Thompson’: leaves unremarkable; flowers very large, white, with the petals measuring up to 4 cm long.

‘Discovery’: classic ivy-like foliage in shades of green and grey-green; flowers pure white, up to 3.5 cm long; the first flowers to open are the largest, the later ones more normal size. A Basil Smith selection, possibly now extinct in cultivation.

‘Nettleton Silver’: leaves silver or pewter-coloured, with a rounded, slightly toothed but not lobed margin, the silver cast breaking up into pewter and silver veining along the leaf margin; flowers pure white. A Potterton and Martin selection developed from white flowered, silver leaved plants from Phil Cornish, therefore in essence a very similar plant to ‘White Cloud’.

‘Perlenteppich’: leaves rather oval in shape, less lobed than most forms of C. hederifolium; flowers white, may have pink in the throat of the corolla; selection of German origin. Perlenteppich translates to ‘Pearl Carpet’.

‘White Mist’: a selection by Jaques Amand; flowers, white; leaves, very variable silvery grey foliage; offered on their 2020 web catalogue; looks very similar to ‘White Cloud’.

‘Silver Foil’: leaves very bright silver, arrow head shaped; flowers white; the original plant was selected by Basil Smith.

‘Tilebarn Helena’: leaves silver, arrow head shaped; flowers white; the original plant was found in seedlings grown by Helena Weisner, who gave it to Peter Moore.

‘Tilebarn Shirley’: leaves narrow, ovate, very dark green with a bright silver shield shaped mark in the centre; flowers white.

‘White Bowles’s Apollo’: silver or pewter-coloured leaves, sometimes with an overlying flush of pink, although this is variable; flowers white; the original ‘Bowles’s Apollo’ plant named by Gerard Parker was found by him in the garden of E. A. Bowles at Myddelton House. The leaves were remarkable for the large shield-shaped area of silver in the centre and another around the margin, separated by a green zone. This white flowered variant was developed by Dave Hoskins of Ringwood.

‘White Cloud’: silver or pewter-coloured leaves varying in shape from almost entire and heart-shaped to markedly lobed; flowers white.

Cyclamen intaminatum

‘E. K. Balls’: leaves generally deep green with a zone of silvery green blotches; flowers white, at the small end of the size range for the species; a name used to denote plants derived from the original collection by E.K. Balls in Turkey, now many generations down the line and indistinguishable from other plants in cultivation.

Cyclamen libanoticum

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen maritimum

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen mirabile

‘Tilebarn Anne’: leaves bright silver with no markings and attractively etched veins, but notable for being flushed bright pink all over, when freshly emerged.

‘Tilebarn Jan’: This cultivar has similar leaves to ‘Tilebarn Nicholas’ but has white flowers; leaves bright silver with a dark green central ‘Christmas-tree’ shaped pattern.

‘Tilebarn Nicholas’: leaves bright silver with a dark green central ‘Christmas-tree’ shaped pattern, but notable for the silver areas being flushed bright pink, when freshly emerged.

Cyclamen parviflorum

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen persicum

Cyclamen persicum var. autumnale

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen persicum var. persicum

‘Album’: pure white-flowered variants have been named as ‘Album’ but should all properly be referred to as C. persicum forma albidum.

‘Ashwood Silver Leaf’: attractive variable silvered hastate foilage; flowers, pale pink with a deeper blotch, typical of the species.

‘Silver Leaf’: from seed collected south of Tripoli in the Lebanon by Jim Archibald (JCA 1050); this exceptional silver leaf form was selected by Melvyn Jope.

‘Tilebarn Karpathos’: leaves unremarkable for the species; flowers deep cerise with notably twisted petals, a very dark form selected by Peter Moore of Tile Barn Nursery (now closed) referable to C. persicum forma puniceum.

Cyclamen pseudibericum

‘White Hope’: Attributable to C. pseudibericum forma candidum, with completely white flowers. The leaves are typical of the species.

Cyclamen purpurascens

‘Album’: pure white-flowered variants have been named as ‘Album’ they are not cultivars and should all properly be referred to as C. purpurascens forma album.

‘Fatra Form’: not a cultivar and should be properly referred to as C. pupurascens subsp. immaculatum.

‘Garibaldi’: leaves with a bright silver centre and silver veins extending across a broad green margin; flowers pink with short broad petals; a vigorous plant.

‘Green Ice’: leaves with a central mint green Christmas tree pattern and veins extending into a dark green background; flowers deep pink, typical of the species.

‘Green Lake’: leaves silver-green with veins extending across a broad green margin but with a darker green hastate shape in the centre; flowers pink, typical of the species.

‘Lake Bled Form’: leaves beautifully silvered with a netted pattern of veins towards the margin; flowers pink, typical of the species; the original plant was collected from around Lake Bled in Slovenia, where it has now almost disappeared as a result of further extensive collection.

‘Lake Garda’: leaves silvery with a thin green margin and a central arrowhead zone; flowers pink, typical of the species.

‘Limone Form’: leaves almost entirely silvered, with narrow green bands around the margin and a faint grey hastate pattern in the centre; flowers deep pink.

‘Picco Rosso’: leaves have a green central hastate pattern, surrounded by a strong pink flush with pink veins extending into a mint green margin; flowers pink, typical of the species.

‘Striatum’: leaves, pale green with slightly darker green netting at the margin; flowers pale pink with darker purple stripes (striation, hence the name).

‘Verdume’: leaves plain green; flowers pink, typical of the species; selected by Jan Bravenboer of Green Ice Nursery (now closed) in the Netherlands.

Cyclamen repandum

‘Album’: pure white-flowered variants have been named as ‘Album’ they are not cultivars and should all properly be referred to as C. repandum forma album.

‘Amazing Hope’: leaves with a well defined silver central hastate pattern: flowers pink, typical of the species.

Cyclamen rhodium subsp. rhodium

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen rhodium subsp. peloponnesiacum

‘Pelops’: shiny grey-green leaves generously speckled with pale olive-green; flowers with their narrow twisted petals are pale reddish-purple with a rich maroon-red nose.

Silver-Leaf Group: leaves all over silver; flowers pale pink with a dark nose, typical of the species; the basis for this group was an original plant collected by the Cyclamen Society in 1992 and selected by Mr Forster from a site above Paleopanagia under the number CSE92203.

Cyclamen rhodium subsp. vividum

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen rohlfsianum

Currently no named cultivars.

Cyclamen somalense

Currently not in cultivation, no named cultivars.